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Life in Shadows: Hidden Children and the Holocaust

Life in Shadows: Hidden Children and the Holocaust

March 20, 2005 to July 31, 2005

Life in Shadows: Hidden Children and the Holocaust was organized and circulated by the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.

When World War II ended in 1945, six million European Jews were dead, murdered in the Holocaust. More than one million of the victims were children.

Driven by a racist ideology that viewed Jews worthy only of eradication, the Nazis implemented genocide on an unprecedented scale. Slated for destruction were all of Europe's Jews: the sick and the healthy, the rich and the poor, the religiously orthodox and converts to Christianity, the aged and the young, even infants.

Thousands of Jewish children survived this brutal carnage, however, many of them as hidden children. With identities disguised, often physically concealed from the outside world, these youngsters faced constant fear and danger. Theirs was a life in shadows, where an accidental remark, a denunciation or the murmurings of inquisitive neighbors could lead to discovery and death.

Life in Shadows explored the remarkable history of children who went underground to escape Nazi persecution and destruction. This special exhibition detailed stories of desperation, tragedy, courage, love and survival in the darkest of times. To tell this poignant history, the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum assembled documents, photographs and objects from all over the world, donated by or borrowed from hidden children themselves and their rescuers.

Visit the on-line version of the Life in Shadows exhibit, available courtesy of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum.

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