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Fifty Years of Christian-Jewish Dialogue

Fifty Years of Christian-Jewish Dialogue

Has the Relationship Been Permanently Altered?

Sunday, October 19, 2014 2:00 pm


The Declaration by the Second Vatican Council in October 1965 profoundly altered the church's understanding of Jews and Judaism. Fr. John Pawlikowski, a leading figure in interfaith relations, talked about Vatican II's impact on Christian-Jewish relations right up to the present day.

Fr. Pawlikowski addressed how Judaism has responded to the changes in Christianity. He explained current issues of tension and hope and examine whether Vatican II has brought lasting change.

Fr. John T. Pawlikowski, OSM, is a Servite priest and Professor of Ethics at the Catholic Theological Union. He served for six years as President of the International Council of Christians and Jews, was appointed to the board of the United States Holocaust Museum by Presidents Clinton, Bush, and Obama, and served three times as a member of the Vatican Delegation for International Jewish-Catholic Dialogue.

Fr. Pawlikowski holds a PhD from University of Chicago, is a prodigious speaker and author, and serves on advisory boards and councils for numerous organizations including the Parliament of the World's Religions and the United States Committee for the World Conference of Religions for Peace.

 

Resources

For some background on Vatican II,
Fr. Pawlikoski recommends this overview from the ADL:

Nosta Aetate: What is it?

In 1965, the Second Vatican Council made historic changes to church policies and theology. Among them was Nostra Aetate, Latin for "In Our Time," a document that revolutionized the Catholic Church's approach to Jews and Judaism after nearly 2000 years of pain and sorrow. MORE>


For further information on the subject, we suggest this article by Fr. Pawlikoski, origninally published in the Winter 2014 issue of the Journal of Ecumenical Studies:

Fifty Years of Christian-Jewish Dialogue — What Has It Changed?

Nostra aetate, together with its documents on ecumenical relations and religious liberty, provided the impetus for a substantial renovation of relationships among the various Christian denominations and, more broadly, perceptions within the churches of non-Christian religious traditions, Judaism in particular. MORE>

Sponsors

This was the annual Horwitz Family Lecture in Jewish History, generously endowed by the Horwitz Charitable Fund.

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