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Past Exhibits

Past Exhibits

Voices & Visions™

In a series of 18 striking images, the words of Jewish luminaries from Maimonides to Susan Sontag are newly interpreted and graphically transformed by renowned artists and designers including Milton Glaser, Carin Goldberg, Seymour Chwast, and Chicago's Art Paul.

Shalom Chicago

Presented in collaboration with Spertus Institute, Shalom Chicago is an exhibit at the Chicago History Museum about the city’s Jewish community.

Tales, Myths, and Nightmares

In Tales, Myths, and Nightmares, Yohanan Petrovsky-Shtern introduced a cast of characters he called “irreducible,” like the spare style and primary colors he uses to set his scenes. His paintings personify fragile survivors who represent the struggle and strength of the Jewish experience.

Hassidic Courts

As a photojournalist for the Reuters news agency, Gil Cohen-Magen was assigned in 2001 to take pictures of Jewish new year’s customs in Mea Shearim, one of the oldest neighborhoods in Jerusalem and a longtime enclave for the Haredi or ultra-Orthodox Jewish community.

Woodcut Prints by Todros Geller

In 1918, Ukrainian-born Todros Geller settled in Chicago, becoming an influential artist, a tireless promoter of Jewish art, a passionate educator, and the acknowledged "Dean of Chicago's Jewish artists."

Building Communities JUF Window Display

Spertus presented Building Community, a display of Chicago's Jewish history in the windows of the Jewish United Fund / Jewish Federation of Metropolitan Chicago.

Jewish Monuments of the Czech Republic

Photographer Ivan Prokop was born in Prague in 1954. His hauntingly beautiful photographs of Jewish cemeteries and synagogues in the Czech Republic appear in a travel guide entitled Nine Jewish Journeys – Walking the Monuments of Bohemia, Moravia and Silesia. Thirteen photos are featured.

Uncovered & Rediscovered

Uncovered & Rediscovered was an evolving exhibit that explored the Chicago Jewish experience. The exhibit unfolded over time in a series of intimate chapters (each on display for 3 to 6 months in the ground floor vestibule of the Spertus building).

What Does It Say to You?

What Does It Say to You? borrowed its title from a classic museum scene in Woody Allen’s Play It Again, Sam. This exhibit was conceived to deepen the conversation between Spertus and its audiences by soliciting responses to its content.

Ground Level Projects

Spertus’s Ground Level Projects was a dynamic new initiative consisting of a series of artist commissions for Spertus’ glass-enclosed, street-level vestibule space.